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Patent Analysis of

Haptic feedback for a touch input device

Updated Time 15 March 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10061385

Application Number

US15/004423

Application Date

22 January 2016

Publication Date

28 August 2018

Current Assignee

MICROSOFT TECHNOLOGY LICENSING, LLC

Original Assignee (Applicant)

MICROSOFT TECHNOLOGY LICENSING, LLC

International Classification

G06F3/041,G06F3/01,G06F3/0354,G06F3/0488

Cooperative Classification

G06F3/016,G06F3/04883,G06F3/0416,G06F3/03547,G06F3/0488

Inventor

CHURIKOV, ANATOLY YURYEVICH,PROTASIO RIBEIRO, FLAVIO,PICCIOTTO, CARL E.,FITZ-COY, ARIC A.,BATHICHE, STEVEN NABIL

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

Haptic feedback for a touch input device Haptic feedback for a touch input device Haptic feedback for a touch input device
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Abstract

Techniques for haptic feedback for a touch input device are described. Generally, haptic feedback is provided for different user interactions with a touch input device, such as interactions with applications, services, and so forth. According to various embodiments, how haptic feedback is initiated depends on whether different functionalities directly support haptic feedback. For instance, techniques described herein enable haptic feedback to be provided whether or not a particular functionality directly supports haptic feedback.

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Claims

What is claimed is:

1. A system comprising: a haptic-enabled touch input device; at least one processor; and one or more computer-readable storage media including instructions stored thereon that, responsive to execution by the at least one processor, cause the system perform operations including: receiving an indication of input via the touch input device indicating a user interaction with a functionality, the functionality representing one of an application or an operating system; ascertaining whether haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event received from the functionality, or whether haptic feedback is to be initiated by an internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input, said ascertaining based on at least in part on a determination of whether the functionality supports haptic feedback; and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on one of the external haptic event or the internal haptic event, including at least one of: in an event that a determination is made that the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the external haptic event, and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event; or in an event that a determination is made that the functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the internal haptic event, and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the internal haptic event.

2. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein the touch input device comprises one or more of a haptic-enabled trackpad, a haptic-enabled touchscreen, or a haptic-enabled pen.

3. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein the one or more computer-readable storage media comprises firmware of the touch input device.

4. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein the operations further include determining that the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, wherein said ascertaining comprises ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the external haptic event, and said causing comprises causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event.

5. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein the functionality comprises the application, the application currently has focus, the operations further include determining that the application directly supports haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining comprises ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event received from the application, and said causing comprises causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event received from the application.

6. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein the functionality comprises the operating system, the operations further include determining that the operating system directly supports haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining comprises ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event received from the operating system, and said causing comprises causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event received from the operating system.

7. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein the operations further include determining that the functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, wherein said ascertaining comprises ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the internal haptic event, and said causing comprises causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the internal haptic event.

8. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein the functionality comprises the application, the application currently has focus, the operations further include determining that the application does not directly support haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining comprises ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the internal haptic event, and said causing comprises causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the internal haptic event.

9. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein the functionality comprises the operating system, the operations further include determining that the operating system does not directly support haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining comprises ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the internal haptic event, and said causing comprises causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the internal haptic event.

10. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein said ascertaining comprises ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the internal haptic event, and said causing comprises: ascertaining one or more attributes of a gesture used to provide the input to the touch input device; and causing output of the haptic feedback based on the one or more attributes.

11. A computer-implemented method, comprising: receiving an indication of input to a touch surface of a touch input device; ascertaining whether haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event received from a functionality representing one of an application or an operating system, or whether haptic feedback is to be initiated by an internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input, said ascertaining based on at least in part on a determination of whether the functionality supports haptic feedback; and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on one of the external haptic event or the internal haptic event, including at least one of: in an event that a determination is made that the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the external haptic event received from the functionality; or in an event that a determination is made that the functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback is to be initiated by the internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input.

12. A method as described in claim 11, further comprising determining based on haptic data whether the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining comprises one of: in an event that the haptic data indicates that the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the external haptic event received from the functionality; or in an event that the haptic data indicates that the functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback is to be initiated by the internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input.

13. A method as described in claim 11, further comprising receiving a notification that the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, wherein said ascertaining comprises ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the external haptic event, and said causing comprises causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event.

14. A method as described in claim 11, wherein said ascertaining comprises ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the internal haptic event, and said causing comprises: ascertaining one or more attributes of a gesture used to provide the input to the touch input device; mapping the attributes of the gesture to haptic feedback; and causing output of the haptic feedback.

15. A computer-implemented method, comprising: receiving an indication of input to a touch input device; determining that a functionality external to the touch input device does not directly support haptic feedback, the functionality representing one of an application or an operating system; ascertaining, responsive to said determining, that haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input; ascertaining one or more attributes of a gesture that caused the input; and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback in response to the internal haptic event and based on the one or more attributes of the gesture.

16. A method as described in claim 15, wherein said determining comprises receiving a notification that the functionality does not directly support haptic feedback.

17. A method as described in claim 15, wherein the functionality comprises the application, the application does not directly support haptic feedback, and wherein the input comprises input to a graphical user interface of the application.

18. A method as described in claim 15, wherein the functionality comprises the operating system, and the operating system does not directly support haptic feedback.

19. A method as described in claim 15, wherein said ascertaining one or more attributes of the gesture comprises ascertaining one or more of a direction of movement of the gesture relative to the touch input device, distance of movement of the gesture, velocity of movement of the gesture, acceleration of the gesture, deceleration of the gesture, or an amount of pressure applied to the touch input device while generating the gesture.

20. A method as described in claim 15, wherein the functionality comprises the application, and wherein said causing is performed independent of information concerning an input context of the application.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A system comprising
    • a haptic-enabled touch input device
    • at least one processor
    • and one or more computer-readable storage media including instructions stored thereon that, responsive to execution by the at least one processor, cause the system perform operations including: receiving an indication of input via the touch input device indicating a user interaction with a functionality, the functionality representing one of an application or an operating system
    • ascertaining whether haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event received from the functionality, or whether haptic feedback is to be initiated by an internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input, said ascertaining based on at least in part on a determination of whether the functionality supports haptic feedback
    • and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on one of the external haptic event or the internal haptic event, including at least one of: in an event that a determination is made that the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the external haptic event, and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event
    • or in an event that a determination is made that the functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the internal haptic event, and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the internal haptic event.
    • 2. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein
      • the touch input device comprises
    • 3. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein
      • the one or more computer-readable storage media comprises
    • 4. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein
      • the operations further include determining that the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, wherein
    • 5. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein
      • the functionality comprises
    • 6. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein
      • the functionality comprises
    • 7. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein
      • the operations further include determining that the functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, wherein
    • 8. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein
      • the functionality comprises
    • 9. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein
      • the functionality comprises
    • 10. A system as recited in claim 1, wherein
      • said ascertaining comprises
  • 11
    11. A computer-implemented method, comprising
    • receiving an indication of input to a touch surface of a touch input device
    • ascertaining whether haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event received from a functionality representing one of an application or an operating system, or whether haptic feedback is to be initiated by an internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input, said ascertaining based on at least in part on a determination of whether the functionality supports haptic feedback
    • and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on one of the external haptic event or the internal haptic event, including at least one of: in an event that a determination is made that the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the external haptic event received from the functionality
    • or in an event that a determination is made that the functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback is to be initiated by the internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input.
    • 12. A method as described in claim 11, further comprising
      • determining based on haptic data whether the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining comprises one of: in an event that the haptic data indicates that the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the external haptic event received from the functionality
      • or in an event that the haptic data indicates that the functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback is to be initiated by the internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input.
    • 13. A method as described in claim 11, further comprising
      • receiving a notification that the functionality directly supports haptic feedback, wherein said ascertaining comprises ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the external haptic event, and said causing comprises causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event.
    • 14. A method as described in claim 11, wherein
      • said ascertaining comprises
  • 15
    15. A computer-implemented method, comprising
    • receiving an indication of input to a touch input device
    • determining that a functionality external to the touch input device does not directly support haptic feedback, the functionality representing one of an application or an operating system
    • ascertaining, responsive to said determining, that haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input
    • ascertaining one or more attributes of a gesture that caused the input
    • and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback in response to the internal haptic event and based on the one or more attributes of the gesture.
    • 16. A method as described in claim 15, wherein
      • said determining comprises
    • 17. A method as described in claim 15, wherein
      • the functionality comprises
    • 18. A method as described in claim 15, wherein
      • the functionality comprises
    • 19. A method as described in claim 15, wherein
      • said ascertaining one or more attributes of the gesture comprises
    • 20. A method as described in claim 15, wherein
      • the functionality comprises
See all 3 independent claims

Description

BACKGROUND

Modern computing devices utilize a variety of different types of feedback to indicate to users that certain functionalities are available and that certain actions are occurring or about to occur. For instance, when a user hovers a cursor over a hyperlink, visual feedback can be presented that indicates that the hyperlink is selectable to navigate to a particular network location. In another example, audio feedback can be presented to indicate an incoming communication, such as a new instant message.

One particularly useful type of feedback is haptic feedback, which provides tactilely-perceptible feedback via various mechanisms. For instance, a touchscreen may employ a tactile device (e.g., a piezo-electric device) to provide a localized vibration when a user presses a virtual button displayed on the touchscreen. Such haptic feedback represents a tactile reinforcement that the user has successfully selected the virtual button, and may be combined with other types of feedback (e.g., visual and audio feedback) to increase the perceptibility of certain actions and functionalities. While haptic feedback can be leveraged in a variety of scenarios, it can be difficult to comprehensively incorporate across different applications and services that may not have the ability to invoke haptic mechanisms.

SUMMARY

This Summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary is not intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.

Techniques for haptic feedback for a touch input device are described. Generally, haptic feedback is provided for different user interactions with a touch input device, such as interactions with applications, services, and so forth. According to various embodiments, how haptic feedback is initiated depends on whether different functionalities directly support haptic feedback. For instance, techniques described herein enable haptic feedback to be provided whether or not a particular functionality directly supports haptic feedback.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The detailed description is described with reference to the accompanying figures. In the figures, the left-most digit(s) of a reference number identifies the figure in which the reference number first appears. The use of the same reference numbers in different instances in the description and the figures may indicate similar or identical items.

FIG. 1 is an illustration of an environment in an example implementation that is operable to employ techniques discussed herein.

FIG. 2 illustrates an example implementation scenario for an application that supports haptic feedback in accordance with one or more embodiments.

FIG. 3 depicts an example implementation scenario for an application that does not directly support haptic feedback in accordance with one or more embodiments.

FIG. 4 is a flow diagram that describes steps in a method for causing output of haptic feedback in accordance with one or more embodiments.

FIG. 5 is a flow diagram that describes steps in a method for determining whether a haptic feedback is to be generated based on an external haptic event or an internal haptic event in accordance with one or more embodiments.

FIG. 6 is a flow diagram that describes steps in a method for determining attributes of haptic feedback in accordance with one or more embodiments.

FIG. 7 illustrates an example system and computing device as described with reference to FIG. 1, which are configured to implement embodiments of techniques described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Overview

Techniques for haptic feedback for a touch input device are described. Generally, haptic feedback is provided for different user interactions with a touch input device, such as interactions with applications, services, and so forth. According to various implementations, how haptic feedback is initiated depends on whether different functionalities directly support haptic feedback.

For instance, consider a first scenario where a user is providing a touch gesture to a haptic-enabled touch input device to provide input to a graphical user interface (GUI) of an application. Further, consider that the application directly supports haptic feedback. An application that directly supports haptic feedback, for instance, represents an application that includes logic to recognize different types of user input and to initiate specific haptic feedback based on the user input and application context. Generally, application context refers to various application-specific scenarios, such as GUI context, application state, and so forth. Accordingly, in this particular scenario the application directly supports haptic feedback, and thus recognizes the user input to the GUI and causes the touch input device to generate haptic feedback based on attributes of the user input.

Consider now a second scenario where a user is providing a touch gesture to the haptic-enabled touch input device to provide input to a GUI of a different application. Further, consider that the different application does not directly support haptic feedback. An application that does not directly support haptic feedback, for instance, represents an application that does not include direct logic to initiate specific haptic feedback based on user input and/or application context. Accordingly, techniques discussed herein enable haptic feedback to be provided on the touch input device even though the different application does not directly support haptic feedback. For example, haptic functionality of the touch input device (e.g., firmware, a device driver, and so forth) recognizes attributes of the touch gesture and generates predefined haptic feedback based on the attributes. Thus, haptic feedback can be provided even though a particular functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, such as a particular application, a particular operating system, and so forth.

Accordingly, techniques described herein enable haptic feedback to be provided across a variety of different systems and functionalities, and in scenarios where particular systems and/or functionalities do not directly support haptic feedback.

In the following discussion, an example environment is first described that is operable to employ techniques described herein. Next, a section entitled "Example Implementation Scenarios" describes some example implementation scenarios in accordance with one or more embodiments. Following this, a section entitled "Example Procedures" describes some example procedures in accordance with one or more embodiments. Finally, a section entitled "Example System and Device" describes an example system and device that are operable to employ techniques discussed herein in accordance with one or more embodiments.

Having presented an overview of example implementations in accordance with one or more embodiments, consider now an example environment in which example implementations may by employed.

Example Environment

FIG. 1 is an illustration of an environment 100 in an example implementation that is operable to employ techniques for haptic feedback for a touch input device described herein. The environment 100 includes a client device 102, which may be configured in a variety of ways, such as a traditional computer (e.g., a desktop personal computer, laptop computer, and so on), a mobile device, an entertainment appliance, a smartphone, a wearable device, a netbook, a game console, a handheld device (e.g., a tablet), and so forth.

The client device 102 includes a variety of different functionalities that enable various activities and tasks to be performed. For instance, the client device 102 includes an operating system 104, applications 106, input/output ("I/O") devices 108, and a haptic module 110. Generally, the operating system 104 is representative of functionality for abstracting various system components of the client device 102, such as hardware, kernel-level modules and services, and so forth. The operating system 104, for instance, can abstract various components of the client device 102 to the applications 106 to enable interaction between the components and the applications 106.

The applications 106 represent functionalities for performing different tasks via the client device 102. Examples of the applications 106 include a word processing application, a spreadsheet application, a web browser, a gaming application, a communication application, and so forth. The applications 106 may be installed locally on the client device 102 to be executed via a local runtime environment, and/or may represent portals to remote functionality, such as cloud-based services, web apps, and so forth. Thus, the applications 106 may take a variety of forms, such as locally-executed code, portals to remotely hosted services, and so forth.

The I/O devices 108 are representative of different functionalities for receiving input to the client device 102 and/or for providing output from the client device 102. Particular instances of the I/O devices 108, for example, represent a dedicated input device, a dedicated output device, or a device that both receives input and provides output. The I/O devices 108 include haptic input/output ("I/O") devices 112, which are representative of devices that are configured to provide haptic output. For instance, the haptic I/O devices 112 include a touchscreen 114 and a trackpad 116, which are configured to provide haptic feedback which is tactilely-perceptible. The touchscreen 114, for example, is not only configured to provide visual output, but can also receive touch input and provide haptic output. Further, the trackpad 116 can not only receive touch input for the client device 102, but can provide various types of haptic output. Generally, the haptic I/O devices 112 may utilize a variety of different haptic-generating mechanisms to generate haptic feedback, such as motors, magnets, linear resonant actuators (LRAs) (magnetic and piezo based), piezo-electric bars, and so forth.

The haptic module 110 is representative of functionality for enabling the client device 102 to provide various types of haptic output. For instance, the haptic module 110 represents hardware and logic for enabling the haptic I/O devices to output various types of haptic feedback. The haptic module 110, for example, includes a haptic application programming interface (API) 118, a haptic driver 120, and gesture mapping 122. Generally, the haptic API 118 and the haptic driver 120 are representative of functionalities to enable various other functionalities to invoke the haptic I/O devices. For instance, the operating system 104 and the applications 106 may call the haptic API 118 to request that a particular haptic I/O device 112 generate haptic feedback. The haptic API 118 then interfaces with the haptic driver 120, which in turn interfaces with the haptic I/O devices 112 to cause the haptic I/O devices 112 to generate haptic feedback. Example interactions between the various entities included in the environment 100 are described below.

The gesture mapping 122 represents mappings of different gestures to different respective types of haptic feedback. For instance, different gesture attributes can cause different respective types of haptic feedback to be generated. As further detailed below, in an event that a functionality external to the haptic I/O devices 112 (e.g., an application 106, the operating system 104, and so forth) does not directly support haptic feedback, the haptic module 110 can detect attributes of a gesture applied to a haptic I/O device 112 and cause a particular type of haptic feedback to be output by the haptic I/O device 112 based on the attributes.

In at least some implementations, the haptic module 110 can be implemented as part of the haptic I/O devices 112, such as in firmware of the haptic I/O devices 112. Alternatively or additionally, the haptic module 110 may be implemented as part of system resources of the client device 102, such as part of the operating system 104.

The client device 102 further includes haptic data 124, which represents information about whether different functionalities directly support haptic feedback. For instance, the haptic data 124 includes identifiers for individual applications of the applications 106, and indicates whether each of the individual applications support haptic feedback. The haptic data 124 may also indicate whether other functionalities directly support haptic feedback, such as the operating system 104, other services that reside on the client device 102, and so forth. Generally, the haptic data 124 may be implemented as part of the haptic module 110, as part of the operating system 104, and/or as a standalone set of haptic data that is accessible by different functionalities of the client device 102.

Further illustrated as part of the environment 100 is a haptic-enabled pen 126, which is representative of an instance of the haptic I/O devices 112. Generally, the haptic-enabled pen 126 represents a handheld input apparatus that includes various internal components that can generate haptic feedback in various scenarios. For instance, the haptic-enabled pen 126 can provide input to the touchscreen 114, and based on various events can generate haptic feedback. The various implementations and scenarios discussed below, for example, may apply to haptic feedback generated by various haptic-enabled devices, such as the trackpad 116, the touchscreen 114, and the haptic-enabled pen 126.

Having described an example environment in which the techniques described herein may operate, consider now a discussion of an example implementation scenario for haptic feedback for a touch input device in accordance with one or more embodiments.

Example Implementation Scenarios

The following section describes some example implementation scenarios for haptic feedback for a touch input device in accordance with one or more implementations. The implementation scenarios may be implemented in the environment 100 discussed above, and/or any other suitable environment.

FIG. 2 depicts an example implementation scenario 200 for an application that directly supports haptic feedback in accordance with one or more implementations. The scenario 200 includes various entities and components introduced above with reference to the environment 100.

In the scenario 200, an application 106a is active and a graphical user interface (GUI) 202 for the application 106a is displayed on the touchscreen 114 of the client device 102. Further, the application 106a is configured to initiate haptic feedback based on various application-related events. For instance, the application 106a includes logic for interacting with the haptic module 110, such as via the haptic API 118. Alternatively or additionally, the application 106a is configured to initiate haptic feedback via interaction with the operating system 104. For instance, the operating system 104 may serve as an intermediary between the application 106a and the haptic module 110.

Continuing with the scenario 200, a user provides input to the trackpad 116 to interact with the GUI 202. For instance, the user's finger 204 moves across the surface of the trackpad 116 to move a cursor 206 within the GUI 202. In this particular example, the user moves the cursor 206 within proximity to an action region 208. Generally, an action region refers to a region of the GUI 202 associated with a particular available action. For instance, the action region 208 is configured to receive user input specifying a particular location for retrieving and displaying weather-related information.

In response to detecting the cursor 206 in proximity to (e.g., touching and/or overlapping) the action region 208, the application 106a fires a haptic event 210 to the haptic module 110. For instance, the haptic event 210 is communicated directly from the application 106a to the haptic module 110 via the haptic API 118. Alternatively, the application 106a communicates the haptic event 210 to the operating system 104, and the operating system 104 forwards the haptic event 210 to the haptic module 110. Generally, the haptic event 210 represents an "external" haptic event since the haptic event 210 is generated by an external functionality that is external to the haptic module 110 and the haptic I/O devices 112.

According to various implementations, the haptic event 210 specifies a particular type of haptic feedback to be generated by the trackpad 116. For instance, different action regions of the GUI 202 can be linked to different types of haptic feedback. Accordingly, in response to receiving the haptic event 210, the haptic module 110 causes the trackpad 116 to generate haptic feedback 212. For instance, the haptic module 110 instructs the haptic driver 120 to cause the trackpad 116 to generate the haptic feedback 212. The haptic feedback 212, for example, is produced by a haptic mechanism of the trackpad 116, and is tactilely perceptible on the surface of the trackpad 116, such as by the user's finger 204.

In at least some implementations, the haptic module 110 is configured to track which applications 106 directly support haptic feedback, and which applications 106 do not. For instance, a particular application 106 that directly supports haptic feedback represents an application 106 that is configured to generate haptic events to notify the haptic module 110 to generate haptic feedback. However, a different application 106 that does not directly support haptic feedback represents an application 106 that is not configured to generate haptic events. Thus, the scenario 200 represents an implementation where the application 106a directly supports haptic feedback and is thus configured to generate the haptic event 210 to cause the haptic feedback 212 to be generated.

FIG. 3 depicts an example implementation scenario 300 for an application that does not directly support haptic feedback in accordance with one or more implementations. The scenario 300 includes various entities and components introduced above with reference to the environment 100. In at least some implementations, the scenario 300 represents an extension and/or variation on the scenario 200, described above.

In the scenario 300, an application 106b is active and a graphical user interface (GUI) 302 for the application 106b is displayed on the touchscreen 114 of the client device 102. Further, the application 106b is not configured to initiate haptic feedback based on various application-related events. For instance, the application 106b does not include logic for interacting with the haptic module 110. The application 106b, for example, does not directly support generating haptic events.

Continuing with the scenario 300, a user provides input to the trackpad 116 to interact with the GUI 202b. For instance, the user's finger 204 moves across the surface of the trackpad 116 to move the cursor 206 within the GUI 302. In this particular example, the user provides a gesture 304 to the trackpad 116 to move the cursor 206 and drag a scroll bar 306 downward. Since the application 106b does not directly support haptic feedback, the haptic module 110 detects the gesture 304 and fires a haptic event 308 to the haptic driver 120. The haptic module 110, for instance, fires the haptic event 308 without direct interaction with the application 106b. Alternatively or additionally, the haptic module 110 queries the operating system 104 for permission to generate haptic feedback (e.g., fire the haptic event 308) while the application 106b is active, e.g., has focus on the touchscreen 114.

Responsive to receiving the haptic event 308, the haptic driver 120 causes the trackpad 116 to generate haptic feedback 310. For instance, the operating system 104 detects that the application 106b has focus and that the application 106b does not directly support haptic feedback, such as based on an entry in the haptic data 124 that indicates that the application 106b does not directly support haptic feedback. Accordingly, the operating system 104 notifies the haptic module 110 (e.g., via the haptic API 118) that an application currently in focus does not directly support haptic feedback. Alternatively or additionally, the operating system 104 notifies the haptic module 110 that the application 106b has focus, and the haptic module 110 looks up the application 106b in the haptic data 124 to determine that the application 106b does not directly support haptic feedback.

Responsive to detecting the gesture 304 and ascertaining that the application 106b does not directly support haptic feedback, the haptic module 110 determines that the haptic feedback 310 is to be generated by the trackpad 116. In an example implementation, the haptic module 110 determines a gesture type for the gesture 304, and determines the haptic feedback 310 based on the gesture type. The haptic module 110, for instance, determines the gesture type based on attributes of the gesture 304. Examples of such gesture attributes include direction of movement of the gesture relative to the trackpad 116 (e.g., up, down, left, right, and so forth), distance of movement, velocity of movement, acceleration and/or deceleration, an amount of pressure applied while generating the gesture 304, and so forth. One of more of such gesture attributes can be considered in characterizing a gesture type for the gesture 304.

For example, different sets of gesture attributes can correspond to different respective gesture types. Further, different gesture types can be mapped to different respective types of haptic feedback, such as in the gesture mapping 122. For instance, a tap gesture can be mapped to one type of haptic feedback, a swipe gesture to another type of haptic feedback, a drag gesture to still another type of haptic feedback, and so on. In the particular example presented in scenario 300, the haptic module 110 ascertains that the gesture 304 is a downward dragging gesture on the trackpad 116, maps the gesture 304 to haptic feedback identified for the gesture 304 in the gesture mapping 122, and generates the haptic event 308 to identify the haptic feedback 310. Based on information included in the haptic event 308, the haptic driver 120 initiates the haptic feedback 310 on the trackpad 116.

According to various implementations, the haptic module 110 causes the haptic feedback 310 to be generated by the trackpad 116 independent of a notification from the application 106b to generate haptic feedback, and independent of any information concerning an input context of the application 106b. For instance, the haptic module 110 causes the haptic feedback 310 to be generated based on attributes of the gesture 304 itself and without any input (e.g., context and/or instructions) from the application 106b. Thus, the haptic event 308 represents an "internal" haptic event since the haptic event 308 is generated internally to the haptic module 110 and/or the trackpad 116 and independent of direct interaction with the application 106b.

Accordingly, the scenarios described above illustrate that implementations for haptic feedback for a touch input device described herein can differentiate between functionalities that directly support haptic feedback and functionalities that do not directly support haptic feedback, and can enable haptic feedback to be generated in both cases. While these scenarios are discussed with reference to different applications, it is to be appreciated that implementations discussed herein can be employed with a wide variety of different functionalities, such as different applications, services, operating systems, and so forth. For instance, techniques described herein can be employed to generate haptic feedback on a device with an operating system that does not directly support haptic feedback.

Further, while the scenarios described above are discussed with reference to the trackpad 116, it is to be appreciated that the scenarios may be implemented with any haptic-enabled device, such as the touchscreen 114, the haptic-enabled pen 126, and so forth.

Having discussed some example implementation scenarios, consider now a discussion of some example procedures in accordance with one or more embodiments.

Example Procedures

The following discussion describes some example procedures for haptic feedback for a touch input device in accordance with one or more embodiments. The example procedures may be employed in the environment 100 of FIG. 1, the system 700 of FIG. 7, and/or any other suitable environment. The procedures, for instance, represent example procedures for implementing the implementation scenarios described above. In at least some implementations, the steps described for the various procedures are implemented automatically and independent of user interaction.

FIG. 4 is a flow diagram that describes steps in a method in accordance with one or more implementations. The method describes an example procedure for causing output of haptic feedback in accordance with one or more implementations. In at least some implementations, the method may be performed at least in part by the haptic module 110 and/or by the operating system 104.

Step 400 receives an indication of input to a touch surface of a touch input device. The haptic module 110, for instance, detects that user input is provided to a touch surface of a haptic I/O device 112, such as one of the trackpad 116 or the touchscreen 114.

Step 402 ascertains whether haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event or an internal haptic event. Generally, an external haptic event represents a haptic event received by the haptic module 110 from an external functionality that is external to the touch input device, such as an application 106 that directly supports haptic feedback, the operating system 104, and so forth. One example implementation of an external haptic event is the haptic event 210 discussed above. An internal haptic event represents a haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input. One example implementation of an internal haptic event is the haptic event 308 discussed above. An example way of determining whether a haptic feedback is to be generated based on an external haptic event or an internal haptic event is discussed below.

In an event that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event ("External"), step 404 receives the external haptic event and causes the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event. For example, the haptic module 110 receives a haptic event from an application 106 and/or the operating system 104. Generally, the haptic event includes information describing attributes of the haptic feedback to be output by the touch input device. Examples of attributes of haptic feedback include vibration frequency, vibration amplitude, feedback duration, haptic pulse information, variations in frequency and/or amplitude, and so forth.

In an event that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an internal haptic event ("Internal"), step 406 causes the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the internal haptic event. For example, the haptic module 110 communicates the internal haptic event to the haptic driver 120 to cause the touch input device (e.g., one of the haptic I/O devices 112) to output haptic feedback. The internal haptic event, for instance, includes information describing attributes of the haptic feedback to be output by the touch input device, examples of which are described above. In at least some implementations, attributes of haptic feedback are determined based on attributes of a gesture applied to the touch input device to generate the input to the touch surface. An example way of determining attributes of haptic feedback is discussed below.

FIG. 5 is a flow diagram that describes steps in a method in accordance with one or more implementations. The method describes an example procedure for determining whether a haptic feedback is to be generated based on an external haptic event or an internal haptic event in accordance with one or more implementations. In at least some implementations, the method may be performed at least in part by the haptic module 110 and/or by the operating system 104.

Step 500 determines whether a functionality external to a touch input device directly supports haptic feedback. The haptic module 110, for instance, determines whether an application 106 that currently has focus on the client device 102 directly supports haptic feedback, and/or whether the operating system 104 directly supports haptic feedback. The applications 106 and the operating system 104, for example, represent functionalities that are external to the touch input device, i.e., external to the haptic I/O devices 112.

If the functionality external to the touch input device directly supports haptic feedback ("Yes"), step 502 determines that haptic feedback is to be generated in response to an external haptic event. An application 106 that currently has focus, for instance, notifies the haptic module 110 that the application directly supports haptic feedback. Alternatively or additionally, the operating system 104 notifies the haptic module 110 that an application 106 that currently has focus directly supports haptic feedback, and/or that the operating system 104 itself directly supports haptic feedback. In at least some implementations, an external functionality interacts with the haptic module 110 via calls to the haptic API 118.

In yet another implementation, the haptic module 110 determines from the haptic data 124 whether a particular application 106 and/or the operating system 104 directly support haptic feedback. For instance, the haptic module 110 can determine whether an external functionality directly supports haptic feedback by ascertaining whether the haptic data 124 indicates that the external functionality directly supports/doesn't directly support haptic feedback.

If the functionality external to the touch input device does not directly support haptic feedback ("No"), step 504 determines that haptic feedback is to be generated in response to an internal haptic event. For instance, the operating system 104 notifies the haptic module 110 that an application 106 that currently has focus does not directly support haptic feedback. Alternatively or additionally, and as discussed above, the haptic module 110 can determine whether an external functionality directly supports haptic feedback by ascertaining whether the haptic data 124 indicates that the external functionality directly supports/doesn't directly support haptic feedback.

FIG. 6 is a flow diagram that describes steps in a method in accordance with one or more implementations. The method describes an example procedure for determining attributes of haptic feedback in accordance with one or more implementations. In at least some implementations, the method may be performed at least in part by the haptic module 110 and/or by the operating system 104. The method, for instance, represents an implementation of step 406 discussed above with reference to FIG. 4.

Step 600 ascertains attributes of a gesture used to provide input to a touch input device. Examples of gesture attributes include direction relative to a surface to which the gesture is applied (e.g., up, down, left, right, and so forth), distance of movement, velocity of movement, acceleration and/or deceleration, an amount of pressure applied while generating the gesture, and so forth.

Step 602 maps the attributes of the gesture to haptic feedback. For instance, different gesture attributes can be mapped to different types of haptic feedback. In at least some implementations, the haptic module 110 maps the attributes of the gesture to a particular type of haptic feedback specified for the attributes in the gesture mapping 122.

Step 604 causes output of the haptic feedback. The haptic module 110, for instance, instructs the haptic driver 120 to output the haptic feedback.

Accordingly, techniques discussed herein enable haptic feedback to be provided in a wide variety of scenarios and across a wide variety of different device configurations.

Having discussed some example procedures, consider now a discussion of an example system and device in accordance with one or more embodiments.

Example System and Device

FIG. 7 illustrates an example system generally at 700 that includes an example computing device 702 that is representative of one or more computing systems and/or devices that may implement various techniques described herein. For example, the client device 102 discussed above with reference to FIG. 1 can be embodied as the computing device 702. The computing device 702 may be, for example, a server of a service provider, a device associated with the client (e.g., a client device), an on-chip system, and/or any other suitable computing device or computing system.

The example computing device 702 as illustrated includes a processing system 704, one or more computer-readable media 706, and one or more Input/Output (I/O) Interfaces 708 that are communicatively coupled, one to another. Although not shown, the computing device 702 may further include a system bus or other data and command transfer system that couples the various components, one to another. A system bus can include any one or combination of different bus structures, such as a memory bus or memory controller, a peripheral bus, a universal serial bus, and/or a processor or local bus that utilizes any of a variety of bus architectures. A variety of other examples are also contemplated, such as control and data lines.

The processing system 704 is representative of functionality to perform one or more operations using hardware. Accordingly, the processing system 704 is illustrated as including hardware element 710 that may be configured as processors, functional blocks, and so forth. This may include implementation in hardware as an application specific integrated circuit or other logic device formed using one or more semiconductors. The hardware elements 710 are not limited by the materials from which they are formed or the processing mechanisms employed therein. For example, processors may be comprised of semiconductor(s) and/or transistors (e.g., electronic integrated circuits (ICs)). In such a context, processor-executable instructions may be electronically-executable instructions.

The computer-readable media 706 is illustrated as including memory/storage 712. The memory/storage 712 represents memory/storage capacity associated with one or more computer-readable media. The memory/storage 712 may include volatile media (such as random access memory (RAM)) and/or nonvolatile media (such as read only memory (ROM), Flash memory, optical disks, magnetic disks, and so forth). The memory/storage 712 may include fixed media (e.g., RAM, ROM, a fixed hard drive, and so on) as well as removable media (e.g., Flash memory, a removable hard drive, an optical disc, and so forth). The computer-readable media 706 may be configured in a variety of other ways as further described below.

Input/output interface(s) 708 are representative of functionality to allow a user to enter commands and information to computing device 702, and also allow information to be presented to the user and/or other components or devices using various input/output devices. Examples of input devices include a keyboard, a cursor control device (e.g., a mouse), a microphone (e.g., for voice recognition and/or spoken input), a scanner, touch functionality (e.g., capacitive or other sensors that are configured to detect physical touch), a camera (e.g., which may employ visible or non-visible wavelengths such as infrared frequencies to detect movement that does not involve touch as gestures), and so forth. Examples of output devices include a display device (e.g., a monitor or projector), speakers, a printer, a network card, tactile-response device, and so forth. Thus, the computing device 702 may be configured in a variety of ways as further described below to support user interaction.

Various techniques may be described herein in the general context of software, hardware elements, or program modules. Generally, such modules include routines, programs, objects, elements, components, data structures, and so forth that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. The terms "module," "functionality," "entity," and "component" as used herein generally represent software, firmware, hardware, or a combination thereof. The features of the techniques described herein are platform-independent, meaning that the techniques may be implemented on a variety of commercial computing platforms having a variety of processors.

An implementation of the described modules and techniques may be stored on or transmitted across some form of computer-readable media. The computer-readable media may include a variety of media that may be accessed by the computing device 702. By way of example, and not limitation, computer-readable media may include "computer-readable storage media" and "computer-readable signal media."

"Computer-readable storage media" may refer to media and/or devices that enable persistent storage of information in contrast to mere signal transmission, carrier waves, or signals per se. Computer-readable storage media do not include signals per se. The computer-readable storage media includes hardware such as volatile and non-volatile, removable and non-removable media and/or storage devices implemented in a method or technology suitable for storage of information such as computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, logic elements/circuits, or other data. Examples of computer-readable storage media may include, but are not limited to, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other memory technology, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (DVD) or other optical storage, hard disks, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or other storage device, tangible media, or article of manufacture suitable to store the desired information and which may be accessed by a computer.

"Computer-readable signal media" may refer to a signal-bearing medium that is configured to transmit instructions to the hardware of the computing device 702, such as via a network. Signal media typically may embody computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data in a modulated data signal, such as carrier waves, data signals, or other transport mechanism. Signal media also include any information delivery media. The term "modulated data signal" means a signal that has one or more of its characteristics set or changed in such a manner as to encode information in the signal. By way of example, and not limitation, communication media include wired media such as a wired network or direct-wired connection, and wireless media such as acoustic, radio frequency (RF), infrared, and other wireless media.

As previously described, hardware elements 710 and computer-readable media 706 are representative of instructions, modules, programmable device logic and/or fixed device logic implemented in a hardware form that may be employed in some embodiments to implement at least some aspects of the techniques described herein. Hardware elements may include components of an integrated circuit or on-chip system, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), a complex programmable logic device (CPLD), and other implementations in silicon or other hardware devices. In this context, a hardware element may operate as a processing device that performs program tasks defined by instructions, modules, and/or logic embodied by the hardware element as well as a hardware device utilized to store instructions for execution, e.g., the computer-readable storage media described previously.

Combinations of the foregoing may also be employed to implement various techniques and modules described herein. Accordingly, software, hardware, or program modules and other program modules may be implemented as one or more instructions and/or logic embodied on some form of computer-readable storage media and/or by one or more hardware elements 710. The computing device 702 may be configured to implement particular instructions and/or functions corresponding to the software and/or hardware modules. Accordingly, implementation of modules that are executable by the computing device 702 as software may be achieved at least partially in hardware, e.g., through use of computer-readable storage media and/or hardware elements 710 of the processing system. The instructions and/or functions may be executable/operable by one or more articles of manufacture (for example, one or more computing devices 702 and/or processing systems 704) to implement techniques, modules, and examples described herein.

As further illustrated in FIG. 7, the example system 700 enables ubiquitous environments for a seamless user experience when running applications on a personal computer (PC), a television device, and/or a mobile device. Services and applications run substantially similar in all three environments for a common user experience when transitioning from one device to the next while utilizing an application, playing a video game, watching a video, and so on.

In the example system 700, multiple devices are interconnected through a central computing device. The central computing device may be local to the multiple devices or may be located remotely from the multiple devices. In one embodiment, the central computing device may be a cloud of one or more server computers that are connected to the multiple devices through a network, the Internet, or other data communication link.

In one embodiment, this interconnection architecture enables functionality to be delivered across multiple devices to provide a common and seamless experience to a user of the multiple devices. Each of the multiple devices may have different physical requirements and capabilities, and the central computing device uses a platform to enable the delivery of an experience to the device that is both tailored to the device and yet common to all devices. In one embodiment, a class of target devices is created and experiences are tailored to the generic class of devices. A class of devices may be defined by physical features, types of usage, or other common characteristics of the devices.

In various implementations, the computing device 702 may assume a variety of different configurations, such as for computer 714, mobile 716, and television 718 uses. Each of these configurations includes devices that may have generally different constructs and capabilities, and thus the computing device 702 may be configured according to one or more of the different device classes. For instance, the computing device 702 may be implemented as the computer 714 class of a device that includes a personal computer, desktop computer, a multi-screen computer, laptop computer, netbook, and so on.

The computing device 702 may also be implemented as the mobile 716 class of device that includes mobile devices, such as a mobile phone, portable music player, portable gaming device, a tablet computer, a wearable device, a multi-screen computer, and so on. The computing device 702 may also be implemented as the television 718 class of device that includes devices having or connected to generally larger screens in casual viewing environments. These devices include televisions, set-top boxes, gaming consoles, and so on.

The techniques described herein may be supported by these various configurations of the computing device 702 and are not limited to the specific examples of the techniques described herein. For example, functionalities discussed with reference to the haptic module 110 may be implemented all or in part through use of a distributed system, such as over a "cloud" 720 via a platform 722 as described below.

The cloud 720 includes and/or is representative of a platform 722 for resources 724. The platform 722 abstracts underlying functionality of hardware (e.g., servers) and software resources of the cloud 720. The resources 724 may include applications and/or data that can be utilized while computer processing is executed on servers that are remote from the computing device 702. Resources 724 can also include services provided over the Internet and/or through a subscriber network, such as a cellular or Wi-Fi network.

The platform 722 may abstract resources and functions to connect the computing device 702 with other computing devices. The platform 722 may also serve to abstract scaling of resources to provide a corresponding level of scale to encountered demand for the resources 724 that are implemented via the platform 722. Accordingly, in an interconnected device embodiment, implementation of functionality described herein may be distributed throughout the system 700. For example, the functionality may be implemented in part on the computing device 702 as well as via the platform 722 that abstracts the functionality of the cloud 720.

Discussed herein are a number of methods that may be implemented to perform techniques discussed herein. Aspects of the methods may be implemented in hardware, firmware, or software, or a combination thereof. The methods are shown as a set of steps that specify operations performed by one or more devices and are not necessarily limited to the orders shown for performing the operations by the respective blocks. Further, an operation shown with respect to a particular method may be combined and/or interchanged with an operation of a different method in accordance with one or more implementations. Aspects of the methods can be implemented via interaction between various entities discussed above with reference to the environment 70.

Implementations discussed herein include:

Example 1

A system for causing haptic feedback, the system including: a haptic-enabled touch input device; at least one processor; and one or more computer-readable storage media including instructions stored thereon that, responsive to execution by the at least one processor, cause the system perform operations including: receiving an indication of input via the touch input device; ascertaining whether haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event received from an external functionality that is external to the touch input device, or whether haptic feedback is to be initiated by an internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input; and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on one of the external haptic event or the internal haptic event.

Example 2

A system as described in example 1, wherein the touch input device includes one or more of a haptic-enabled trackpad, a haptic-enabled touchscreen, or a haptic-enabled pen.

Example 3

A system as described in one or more of examples 1 or 2, wherein the one or more computer-readable storage media includes firmware of the touch input device.

Example 4

A system as described in one or more of examples 1-3, wherein the operations further include determining that the external functionality directly supports haptic feedback, wherein said ascertaining includes ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event, and said causing includes causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event.

Example 5

A system as described in one or more of examples 1-4, wherein the external functionality includes an application that currently has focus, the operations further include determining that the application directly supports haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining includes ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event received from the application, and said causing includes causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event.

Example 6

A system as described in one or more of examples 1-5, wherein the external functionality includes an operating system, the operations further include determining that the operating system directly supports haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining includes ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event received from the operating system, and said causing includes causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event.

Example 7

A system as described in one or more of examples 1-6, wherein the operations further include determining that the external functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, wherein said ascertaining includes ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an internal haptic event, and said causing includes causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the internal haptic event.

Example 8

A system as described in one or more of examples 1-7, wherein the external functionality includes an application that currently has focus, the operations further include determining that the application does not directly support haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining includes ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an internal haptic event, and said causing includes causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the internal haptic event.

Example 9

A system as described in one or more of examples 1-8, wherein the external functionality includes an operating system, the operations further include determining that the operating system does not directly support haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining includes ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an internal haptic event, and said causing includes causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the internal haptic event.

Example 10

A system as described in one or more of examples 1-9, wherein said ascertaining includes ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an internal haptic event, and said causing includes: ascertaining one or more attributes of a gesture used to provide the input to the touch input device; and causing output of the haptic feedback based on the one or more attributes.

Example 11

A computer-implemented method for causing output of haptic feedback, the method including: receiving an indication of input to a touch surface of a touch input device; ascertaining whether haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event received from an external functionality that is external to the touch input device, or whether haptic feedback is to be initiated by an internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input; and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on one of the external haptic event or the internal haptic event.

Example 12

A method as described in example 11, further including determining based on haptic data whether the external functionality directly supports haptic feedback, and wherein said ascertaining includes one of: in an event that the haptic data indicates that the external functionality directly supports haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by the external haptic event received from an external functionality; or in an event that the haptic data indicates that the external functionality does not directly support haptic feedback, ascertaining that the haptic feedback is to be initiated by the internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input.

Example 13

A method as described in one or more of examples 11 or 12, further including receiving a notification that the external functionality directly supports haptic feedback, wherein said ascertaining includes ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an external haptic event, and said causing includes causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback based on the external haptic event.

Example 14

A method as described in one or more of examples 11-13, wherein said ascertaining includes ascertaining that the haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an internal haptic event, and said causing includes: ascertaining one or more attributes of a gesture used to provide the input to the touch input device; mapping the attributes of the gesture to haptic feedback; and causing output of the haptic feedback.

Example 15

A computer-implemented method for causing output of haptic feedback, the method including: receiving an indication of input to a touch input device; determining that an external functionality external to the touch input device does not directly support haptic feedback; ascertaining, responsive to said determining, that haptic feedback for the input is to be initiated by an internal haptic event generated by the touch input device in response to the input; ascertaining one or more attributes of a gesture that caused the input; and causing the touch input device to output haptic feedback in response to the internal haptic event and based on the one or more attributes of the gesture.

Example 16

A method as described in example 15, wherein said determining includes receiving a notification that the external functionality does not directly support haptic feedback.

Example 17

A method as described in one or more of examples 15 or 16, wherein the external functionality includes an application that does not directly support haptic feedback, and wherein the input includes input to a graphical user interface of the application.

Example 18

A method as described in one or more of examples 15-17, wherein the external functionality includes an operating system that does not directly support haptic feedback.

Example 19

A method as described in one or more of examples 15-18, wherein said ascertaining one or more attributes of the gesture includes ascertaining one or more of a direction of movement of the gesture relative to the touch input device, distance of movement of the gesture, velocity of movement of the gesture, acceleration of the gesture, deceleration of the gesture, or an amount of pressure applied to the touch input device while generating the gesture.

Example 20

A method as described in one or more of examples 15-19, wherein the external functionality includes an application, and wherein said causing is performed independent of information concerning an input context of the application.

CONCLUSION

Techniques for haptic feedback for a touch input device are described. Although embodiments are described in language specific to structural features and/or methodological acts, it is to be understood that the embodiments defined in the appended claims are not necessarily limited to the specific features or acts described. Rather, the specific features and acts are disclosed as example forms of implementing the claimed embodiments.

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